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Saturday, October 11, 2003

 
Limbaugh and Painkillers The word that comes to mind is hypocrite. And I'm a conservative. I can't wait to see what the others have to say. Conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh announced during his radio program Friday that he is addicted to painkillers and is checking into a rehab center to ?break the hold this highly addictive medication has on me [MSNBC[/a]]...

 
How to create a progressive majority This article in the Sunday New York Times Magazine is already online: Notion building, on efforts to create a new liberal think tank known as the Center for American Progress with the goal of building ''an enduring progressive majority.''...

 
Margaret Cho has a blog Hey, comedian (note: not comedienne) Margaret Cho has started a blog! (Thanks to Sheila for the pointer.) It's kind of ... non traditional. In place of links, we get gut-busting rants. Sheila blogs on a family newspaper website and thus...

 
Love Hurts Plastic::SciTech::Living: A study conducted at UCLA has concluded that a broken heart can hurt as much as a knee in the groin.

 
FBI Takes It To The Street - Big City Corruption Or Republican Dirty Tricks? Plastic::Politics::Politics:Democrats: Philadelphia Mayor John Street found that his office had been bugged by the FBI. The FBI isn't saying much and Street is arguing it's part of a Republican plan to sabotage his re-election campaign.

 
Undergraduates Are Promiscuous File-Sharers Last night I was part of a panel that spoke to undergraduates in Hecht Residential College on ?Online File Sharing?. The audience was largely divided between the defiant and the possessors of guilty consciences. My suggestion that the RIAA attempts to stamp out file sharing by suing everyone in sight was likely to be as pleasant and as successful as the War on Drugs produced surprisingly little reaction. I enjoyed meeting fellow panelist Sam Terilli, who told me he had accepted a full-time teaching job at the School of Communications, a school which just gets better and better ever year. It will be fun to have him just across the street. But perhaps the most interesting thing I learned was this statistic, offered by a speaker from the University?s IT department. Two years ago, network traffic was 80% incoming, 20% outgoing. Last year it was 20% incoming and 80% outgoing?and the difference was due to people making files available for P2P file sharing. As a result the university closed down the ports most commonly used by Kazaa and other popular file-sharing tools, and the balance is almost back to normal....

 
Eric Muller Blogs From 'Law, Loyalty, and Treason' Eric Muller is blogging from a conference I wish I could attend, the UNC Law Review?s symposium on Law, Loyalty, and Treason. Instead I?m about to leave for our Retreat. His second meaty post is about a paper by Marion Crain of UNC Law School and Ken Matheny of the Social Security Administration which shows that worplace disloyalty has often been treated by those in power as subversion and disloyalty akin to treason. Does this mean that deep in their hearts Big Employers are basically feudal?...

 
New Papers on the Net Here is today's roundup:

 
Ashcroft's Inner Sanctum The more I read about Attorney General John Ashcroft, the less I like it: Since taking the reins of the Justice Department in February 2001, Attorney General John Ashcroft has relied heavily on a cadre of close advisers to monitor...

 
No First Amendment Protection for Lawyer's Rants Rants? What rants? An attorney's poison-pen letter to former West Hartford Probate Judge John A. Berman is not protected free speech, a Connecticut Superior Court judge ruled late last month, upholding a reprimand lodged against Joseph Notopoulos. The West Hartford,...

 
Casual Friday

Little time, many links.




 
Are Children Less Free? Should minors be entitled to Miranda warnings? The Supreme Court is going to decide. We think they should, and so...

 
White House E-Mails Mention Wilson and Plame Fox News is reporting that some of the e-mails turned over by White House officials to the Justice Department in...

Friday, October 10, 2003

 
Rush in rehab Rush Limbaugh admitted at the end of his program today that he is addicted to pain medication and is checking...

Perhaps wherever he checks in, they won't let him leave until  he is also rehabilitated of his habit of being a judgmental asshat.

 
Let there be peace! Iranian Wins Nobel Peace Prize "Ebadi, who is the first Iranian and Muslim female to receive the honor, has maintained...

Monday, October 06, 2003

 
Jews mark Yom Kippur by reflecting on '73 war

 
And If I Have A Girl I'll Name Her... Madison Or Moon-Unit, Anything But Sue! Plastic::Etcetera::Kids: "Timberland"? "Lexus"? "Reebok"? Who in the world would name their kid that?

 
Slashdot: "How Were You Fired?" Slashdot is running a discussion entitled How Were You Fired? It?s full of personal stories, some with happy endings, many of them horrible, some totally disgusting, others compelling. Yet another reason to be really, truly, grateful for tenure. Someone somewhere, must write manuals about How To Fire Employees, and those manuals must be full of stuff about turning off computer IDs, escorting people of the premises under guard as if they were felons, and not letting them have their personal possessions from their desks. I know, from talking to victims in places I?ve worked after they were RIF?d, that these things happen even in work environments where they are utterly unnecessary. It can only be due to mindless automatons in Human Resources reading from a one-size-fits-all playbook....

 
Scandal Fatigue? The Florida blog wonders why so few people, and so few newspapers, seem excited about the highly curious decision of the Florida Pension fund (Jeb Bush, future presidential candidate, proprietor), to bail out the financially unsound Edison Corporation (privatized-schools-?r-us) by buying 96% of its soon to be worthless stock, paying off its debts, and providing a line of credit for operating expenses. I suppose Governor Bush likes the irony of using public school teachers? pension funds to prop up the folks trying to reduce if not eliminate the public schools. But that doesn?t excuse making what appears to be at best a highly risky sweetheart investment, and at worst betraying a fiduciary duty....

 
Legal Theory Lexicon: The Reasonable Person...

 
Ambitious Agenda For High Court The Supreme Court term beginning next week will tackle all the subjects you're not supposed to talk about at parties - religion, money and politics. The term also inevitably will bring a return to a topic the justices themselves...

 
Today's New Blawg

Christophe Courchesne is a member of the 3L class and Board of Student Advisors at Harvard Law School. Christophe is attending BloggerCon at the suggestion of his professors John Palfrey and Charles Nesson, and mentions that the Digital Democracy class at Harvard Law will discuss blogging during next week's session, Smart Mobs, Weblogs, Hacktivism: Social and Political Implications of Decentralized Networks, featuring guest Joi Ito.


Christophe has several good comments and observations from BloggerCon, including:




  • A comment raised in the education context is that making blogs a fundamental part of education will potentially contribute to dilution of writing's power by eliminating intermediary filters?

  • The education forum had a tremendous optimism about the use of blogs in education. As a law review editor and a legal writing teacher, I have tremendous doubt about the editorial quality of work that is published "unedited" (including my own). This presents some tension between the Internet prophecies about the wired democratized future and the values of discipline as to writing skills and "thinking carefully before one speaks."

  • Do students who blog develop more finely tuned skills of listening or just a highly developed ability to mouth off within a sophisticated zone of self-publishing?

I don't think these questions can be answered in terms of absolutes. I see weblogs as more of an aid than a threat to edited/quality writing; they make it easier than ever to disseminate. They also can motivate editorial compression in the interest of time (or impulsiveness), and this may may mean an increase in the sum total of unedited or lightly edited writing. My take is the two varieties can peacefully co-exist, both have unique usefulness and value, and good, well considered, well edited writing will continue to distinguish itself from the pack.



 
What the Wilson-Plame Affair Reveals About Bush Matt Welch, associate editor of Reason Magazine, has an excellent article on the Joseph Wilson-Valerie Plame affair and what it...

 
Supremes Reject Baby Death Conviction Appeal Top Court Rejects Baby Death Conviction Appeal
"The U.S. Supreme Court rejected on Monday an appeal by a South Carolina woman convicted of homicide and sentenced to 12 years in prison for causing her baby to be stillborn by using cocaine."

 
The Nobel Peace Prize in a Time of War What do the pope, Bono, former Illinois Gov. George Ryan, and Michael Jackson have in common? They're all part of one of the weakest Nobel Peace Prize slates in history. Peace has been a commodity in such short supply recently that a Norwegian researcher has commented that "no political leaders have distinguished themselves in ways deserving of the prize." Another commentator said this time last year that the committee would send the strongest message to the world by selecting nobody.

 
Web Zen: time kill zen weezer sumo
hangman
catch a fly
beat the quilters
internet tennis
bubble trouble
monkey moon lander
diner
office space

web zen home, web zen store, (Thanks, Frank).


 
Seven reasons why you absolutely must vote on Oct. 7 MoveOn.org has solidified its place as one of the most increasingly influential political groups in the country. They raised $500,000...

 
"I Will Be": The Horror of Harry Chapin's "Sniper" As part of an ongoing investigation of horror, a writer takes a listen to a very disturbing song by the singer of "Cat's in the Cradle." No, really.